My first recollection of buckwheat flour was when I was a child in the 70s. It was a decade where buckwheat flour was making a comeback due to its compelling nutrient profile. I recall it as a ‘hippy’ grain and a bit alternative. I heard about buckwheat pancakes occasionally, but we were a solid Bisquick family. Buckwheat wasn’t something that made its way into our house. Now I love it – and buckwheat flour truly gets the chance to shine in these orange-scented buckwheat chocolate chip cookies. 

Buckwheat flour has appeared in an increasing number of baking recipes lately, from muffins to cakes to cookies. It adds a deep, earthy flavour profile, and a slightly sandy texture to baked goods, making it much more interesting than one-dimensional white flour. And it happens to be gluten free. 

What Is Buckwheat?

Buckwheat and Buckwheat Flour

Buckwheat is an ancient grain that was used in colonial times, and was popular in America from the late 1800s. Like other hearty, nutrient-dense plants such as dandelions, buckwheat can thrive and even spread quickly in poor soil conditions. 

Health Benefits of Buckwheat

Buckwheat is considered a pseudo-cereal, and is part of the Polygonaceae family. Its health benefits include:

More Ways to Use Buckwheat

I’ve used buckwheat flour in the following cookie recipe. The flour is also wonderful in pancakes, bread and it’s used to make noodles (soba). Whole buckwheat is easily enjoyed in: 

  • Salads
  • Rice dishes or pilafs (cooked buckwheat can be subbed for virtually any of your favourite grain dishes)
  • Soups and stews
  • Porridge
  • Burgers
  • Granola  (use instead of oats, or use half oats/half buckwheat)

Creating the Ultimate Buckwheat Chocolate Chip Cookies 

I hadn’t paid much attention to buckwheat flour until lately, when it captured my attention in a cookie at the Volunteer Park Café in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. This sent me on a mission to try and duplicate their delicious buckwheat flour chocolate chip cookie. Its buttery flavour and dark chocolate flecks, with a bit of heft to it, seemed like the perfect cookie. 

In my recipe experimentation, I veered off course from my objective, but with nice results in their own way. I found that the orange flavour naturally complimented buckwheat and dark chocolate, so I wanted to be sure and include it. 

This is the perfect cookie for a fall or winter day with a cup of your favourite warm drink.  And, with all of the buckwheat health benefits, and no refined sugar or gluten, it’s a treat that will make you feel good, too!

Print

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  • 1 cup light buckwheat flour
  • ¼ cup almond flour
  • ½ tsp fine sea salt
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 1/3 cup ghee, butter or coconut oil, softened
  • ½ cup coconut sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1 egg
  • 1 cup dark chocolate chips, or your favourite dark chocolate bar, chopped
  • 1 tsp orange zest

 


  1. In a medium bowl, mix together buckwheat flour, almond flour, baking soda and salt.
  2. In a mixer bowl, beat ghee, butter or coconut oil with coconut sugar on high for about 4 minutes. Add vanilla and egg. Stir in dry ingredients until just combined. Fold in chocolate chips and orange zest.
  3. Chill dough for a few hours, or even better, overnight. This allows the buckwheat to mellow. You can also bake these immediately and they will still be good!
  4. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Scoop 1-inch dough balls onto sheet. Flatten a bit, if desired.
  5. Bake for 12-13 minutes. Cool for a few minutes on the baking sheet, then transfer to a cooling rack. Enjoy!

Notes

These cookies are best when the dough can rest a few hours, preferably overnight, to allow the grains to soften.

  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 13 minutes

Keywords: cookies, gluten-free cookies, buckwheat flour, buckwheat cookies, buckwheat chocolate chip cookies, chocolate chip cookies

About The Author: Ericka Thielke

Ericka

Ericka is a graduate of the 2021 Culinary Nutrition Expert Program, and owns Fittersweet Cookie Dough, a nutrient-dense cookie dough that features premium dark chocolate. She is also a certified chocolatier and loves combining her new knowledge of culinary nutrition with chocolate. She spends her free time finding ways to incorporate chocolate into a healthy life.

Ericka teaches piano in Seattle, and lives with her husband, Stephen, and two daughters who are in college.

Learn More: www.fittersweet.com

 

Academy of Culinary Nutrition

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