The nation’s families recently received another clear message that our education system is not serving all students. Results from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, known as the “nation’s report card,” last month revealed the extent of the learning decline during the pandemic.

It’s time for students to get the help they need. And families have never been hungrier for more options to make that possible.

They are exhausted. Students are frustrated. K-12 educators have one of the highest rates of burnout in the U.S. workforce. Despite this, our schools are being asked to take on more. Which all begs the question: Should we expect the traditional education system to add responsibilities when we already know that it has not been able to keep up over the past few years?

Craig Hulse and Derrell Bradford

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